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20110701
20110731
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-coverage or visit travelers.com. >>> the scandal shaking up the murdoch empire in britain has now reached this shores with some asking whether news corp's activity here in the united states should be scrutinized. today frank lautenberg submitted a letter to the attorney general where he wrote the limited information already reported in this case raises serious questions about the legality of the conduct of news corporation and its subsidiaries under the fcpa. he goes on to say further investigation may reveal that current reports only scratch the surface of the problems at news corporation. accordingly, i am request that doj and the s.e.c. examine these circumstances and determine whether u.s. laws have been violated. the senator's letter mirrors similar outrage from senator rockefeller from west virginia and senator robert menendez of new jersey and today brought news that murdoch abandoned his bid to take over british sky broadcasting. the question remains how much power should one media baron have. joining us now is stephanie gosk. the withdrawal to the bskyb bid is a blow to rupert mu
of the world" when the most disgraceful allegations took place. to many in britain she became the face of this scandal, right? >> reporter: yeah, now she has finally gone after days of sort of clinging on to her job by her fingernails with everyone from the prime minister downward saying she should go. finally, this morning, she did resign. that's not the end of the story yet. she and rupert and james murdoch all have to appear before a committee in the building behind me on tuesday and they will be grilled by politicians who want some answers as to who knew what and when. >> dan rivers live out of london, we will follow the fallout, of course, from that resignation. >>> it took one of the fbi's most intense manhunts to finally nail mob boss whitey bulger but even behind bars, what damage can he still do? deborah feyerick looks into that. >> i met whitey between the age of 15 and 16. >> reporter: john shay, nicknamed red, grew up in a tight knit world of south boston's old housing colony projects. a golden glove boxer with a wild streak wanted to be just like whitey bulger and the gang
thank you and good-bye from britain's best-selling tabloid, the latest fallout from the phone hacking scandal on "morning joe." somewhere in america, there's a doctor who can peer into the future. there's a nurse who can access in an instant every patient's past. and because the whole hospital's working together, there's a family who can breathe easy, right now. somewhere in america, we've already answered some of the nation's toughest healthcare questions. and the over 60,000 people of siemens are ready to do it again. siemens. answers. >>> 47 past the hour. after weeks of controversy, resignations and arrests, britain's "news of the world" published its last issue on sunday. it comes as its rooival, "the mirror," claims today that a new york police officer asked for voice mails of 9/11 victims. stephanie gosk reports on the "news of the world's" demise and its final day. >> with the ink barely dry on the final edition of news of the world, 80-year-old media baron rupert murdoch traveled to the uk to do damage control. on display, his unqualified support of melissa brooks. smiles for
the british prime minister's information, the royal family, victims of crimes in great britain and others attempting to do the same thing with an investigator here in the united states. i see a member of parliament speak to that as well. and i see scotland yard having an investigation of over 5,000 names and several thousand phone numbers. that adds up to me to sufficient enough concern to protect the families of 9/11 and make sure that either this was not true, in which case they can have that sense of security, that their messages from those loved ones on their final days does not in any way revealed. or if it is true, that it should be prosecuted in the united states because access to phone record, unauthorized access to them is punishable under federal law. >> senator jay rockefeller says my bet is we'll find criminal stuff here. you share that view? >> well, i don't want to jump to conclusions, john, but i do want a vigorous review. i see there are some published reports that the fbi is in fact pursuing a review to determine whether a full investigation is necessary. i welcome that.
. siemens. answers. >>> another blockbuster headline today in great britain's tabloid hacking scandal. the media barren rupert murdoch and his top deputies summoned before parliament next week. today a top police official said that it's highly possible that officials sold secrets to murdoch's newspapers. >> reporter: the multifaceted phone hacking scandal is suddenly focused on current and former police officers at london's scotland yard. called before plig politicians answer accusations of systemic incompetence and their answers are telling. >> we know that, there always will be. >> reporter: so who did take bribes? among those questioned, former police officer andy hayman who now writes for "news international." ironic that he led a criticized investigation against the company for phone hacking in 2006. >> while a police officer, did you ever receive payment from any news -- >> good god! absolutely not. i can't believe you suggested that. >> lots of people -- >> come on. absolutely no way. i can say to you -- >> mr. hayman -- >> no, come on, chairman, that's not fair. >> the police
-war britain yts. and a professor looks at the issues of civil rights in the early 199 's. get the complete weekend schedule at c-span.org/history. this weekend on c-span -- live from salt lake city, the nation's governors look at the lessons of 9/11, and the featured speaker, thomas friedman, talks competitiveness and the economy. look for live coverage saturday at 5:30 eastern and sunday at 1:30 eastern. the national governors association, this weekend online on c-span radio and on c-span. >> "washington journal" continues. host: on your screen is congressman john carter, republicans of texas, and as i mentioned before the break, he is a member of the house appropriations committee and also serves as secretary leadership position to the republican conference in the house. well, there's a headline, congressman, on politico, panicky hill scramble for deal. are you feeling a sense of panic about the situation? guest: there's a lot of tension. you can't deny the tension that is everywhere. a lot of the debate is taking place behind closed doors. many people are wondering what's going on. they
opposed to obamacare because i lived under national health in britain for three years and i know what happens. eu end up with a ration care. this last saturday on my program i had a nurse practitioner call in from arkansas who said that already they are being turned down for treatments. they request treatment and are being turned down under medicare because the person is terminal. since they are terminal, the treatment is not worth giving. they suffer and die. there is a woman going blind and that she cannot get treatment for her element that is causing her to go blind, because she is terminal. dr. berwick, put in a recess appointment ito be the head of medicare, is it in a love affair with the british system. they deny people 59.5 because it is not a good investment. even president obama said it was perhaps not the best use of resources to give his grandmother and a hip replacement after she was diagnosed with terminal ccer. i guess she could hobble around in panama she was dying of cancer. that is a -- not the kindh -- whilee around in pain b she was dying of cancer. that is not the
the government is ignoring is the fact that our power grid is ready to go down in 10 years or less. great britain is out one year or less. if that power system goes down, those systems you have built up will not be able to operate. people will lose food. stores will lose food. restaurants will lose food. this happened in world war ii when hitler was in power. they rationed power at 3 days a week. you could not keep food in your refrigerator to last. it is my understanding it would take $1 billion to correct this problem. think of the job creation it would create. guest: great point. there are probably a lot of projects like that to be addressed. the first thing is we have to get a pathway to balance. if we do not do that, we do not have money to do anything. your point is to have congress did into the issues, determine priorities. then let them determine the spending that needs to take place for long-term sustainability of our economy, services, and country. host: bruce cook, the tea party has increased your ideas. guest: we are bipartisan. tosuppaccept anyone who wants support this. i was at a b
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)